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MOSD Student Activities March 30 - April 3

Each week that MOSD is closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic our professionals are providing activities for students and their families to do at home in addition to their scheduled classroom times and teletherapy! 

Feel free to follow along and do these activities with your family! 


Monday, March 30

Spring Nature Walk Scavenger Hunt 

Materials

  • Bag to collect items found
  •  Binoculars (not necessary but would be fun if you have them-You can also make binoculars by gluing or tying two toilet paper rolls together.)
  • Small Shovel
  • Magnifying Glass (if you have one)
  • Scavenger Hunt Sheet (attached) and older children will want to bring a marker or crayon 

Steps

  • Look outside and talk about how the weather is getting warmer, and point out some of the changes. Tell them Winter is over and now it is Spring. Things are changing.  
  • Tell them we are going to go outside for a walk to look for signs of spring. Show them the Scavenger Hunt Sheet and tell them that you are going to look for these items and other signs of Spring.  Do we need a coat?
  • As you search you can also encourage your child to look for something that: moves, smells, is a certain shape, a particular color, starts with a specified letter ( something that starts with the letter r- rock), with a texture (something fuzzy, rough, smooth, bumpy) I would only ask for these one at a time. Feel the bark of a tree. Point out thorns on roses.
  • Listen for birds, ducks, lawn mowers, etc. Break a stick and listen to it crack.
  • During the hunt you can compare shapes of leaves and flowers, etc. Look for flat rocks, large rocks and tiny pebbles. Look for long and short sticks. Which is longer, or the longest.
  • To incorporate numbers you can ask for 3 acorns, or 5 blades of grass, etc. A higher level skill would be to ask,  If I have 3 flowers and I find 2 more, how many flowers will I have? You can also compare amounts: Did we see more birds or more squirrels?
  • Look for things that smell good. Who knows you might even find something that smells yucky!
  • The most fun activity during this scavenger hunt will be to dig in the dirt to look for worms. With all the rain we have had you will likely have a lot of success finding long, short, fat, and thin worms. Many of the children will enjoy holding them to see how they feel and squirm in their hands. 

Language Targets

  • 1-2 Word Targets
    • Throw rock
    • Bird [can] fly.
    • Smell flower
  • 3-5 Word Targets 
    • Can I throw the rock?
    • The bird flew away.
    • This flower smells good.
    • Squirrels like to eat acorns.
  • For children with more advanced language
    • Encourage higher level thinking by asking questions such as Why do you think. ? , What would happen if?, What would you do if...etc. Take what your child says to model correct language structures and to add higher level vocabulary.  

Book: The Wind Blew By by Pat Hutchins

Read Along HERE


Tuesday, March 31

Building Blocks

  • 1-2 word utterances o Blue block (yellow block, green block) o Big block o Little block o Small block o Square block  
  • 3-5 word utterances o The block is blue (the block is yellow, the block is green) o The block is on top o That is a tall tower o The blocks are so tall o Round block or square block? o Does the block roll? o Is the block heavy? o What color is the block?
  • For children with more advanced language o Encourage higher level thinking by asking questions such as “Why do you think…. ?” , “What would happen if…?”, “What would you do if..”.etc. Take what your child says to model correct language structures and to add higher level vocabulary. 

Block Activity Examples 

  • Color Sorting 
    • Pour all of the blocks out over an area and have your child race around to collect the blocks and sort them into piles by color. This a way to practice sorting and learn colors. (also a gross motor activity and exercise for child) 
  • Color Towers
    • Use one color to make towers. While building the structure, talk about the color often. “Wow, that is a tall and green tower!” or “Let’s find more green blocks to add to it.” Or “I love that orange tower you made!”
    • Big/Small or Tall/Short
    • Make two towers that are different sizes and discuss which is bigger and which is smaller. For example, you can ask your child to make a tower and then you will make one at the same time. Then you can ask which one is taller, smaller, bigger, shorter.
  • Counting
    • Count as you are placing the blocks. Or count how many blocks are in the tower you make.  
  • Pattering
    • Make patterns while you are building and speak the patterns out loud as you go. For example, “I am going to make a tower with the pattern red, blue, red, blue.” Then place the red block and say “red.” Then the blue block on top while I say “blue.” This continues over and over until you are done. After you have the pattern tower made, I will say the pattern out loud as you point to each block

Book: Rain by Robert Kalan & Donald Crews

Read Along HERE


Wednesday, April 1

Plastic Bag Kite

Materials

  • Plastic Grocery Bag
  • String (yarn, cut up old shirt, dental floss, etc.)
  • Stickers and Sharpie markers optional for decoration
  • Scissors 

Steps

  • Decorate the grocery bag using stickers and coloring it with sharpies (be careful using sharpies! Regular markers will smear off)
  • Talk about the colors of the stickers and markers
    • Have your child request which stickers they want
  • Tie the string around the handles of the bag making sure the string is long enough for your child to fly it like a kite. Cut the string off.  
    • Discuss how long the string is (try to think of different synonyms for ‘long’)
    • If your child always says ‘cut, cut’ instead of ‘scissors’ make sure you emphasize that you use SCISSORS to cut the string
  • Go outside and fly your ‘kite!’  
    • Discuss how the kite needs wind to fly
    • Have your child try running at different speeds to see if it effects the kite’s ability to fly
    • Ask some high level questions: Do you think it matters if it is sunny or cloudy? Do you think the kite will go higher if you run faster? 

Language Targets

  • 1-2 Word Targets
    • Push [the] sticker
    • Cut [the] string
    • Run!
    • Fly [the] kite
  • 3-5 Word Targets
    • I want the blue sticker
    • I want to cut
    • Run really fast!
    • The kite needs wind
  • For children with more advanced language:
    • Encourage higher level thinking by asking questions such as “Why do you think…. ?” , “What would happen if…?”, “What would you do if..”.etc. Take what your child says to model correct language structures and to add higher level vocabulary.  

Book: Little Blue Tuck by Alice Schertle

Read Along HERE


Thursday, April 2

Playing with Toy Animals 

Materials

  • An assortment of toy animals (plastic, stuffed, wooden, whatever you have)
  • Any sets such as farm, zoo, etc. or boxes 

Steps 

  • Identify the animals that you will be using 
  • Talk about the characteristics of each animal
    • Size
    • Color
    • How it feels
    • What sound it makes
    • Body parts
    • Where does it live 

Toy Animal Activities 

  • Animal sorting
    • Hide the animals in a room. Let your child have an Animal Scavenger Hunt to find them. You can sort them by different attributes: size, color, where they live (farm, zoo, forest, water, etc.), body parts (hooves/feet, 2 legs/4 legs, fur/feathers, etc.). Discuss each thing that you do 
  • Positional Concepts
    • Use animal sets or a box. “The cow is in the barn.” “That silly cow is on the barn!” “Oh, no! The silly cow is under the barn.” Have your child follow directions to put animals in different positions in whatever you have to use at home. As questions such as: “Where did you put the horse?” “Why did you put it there?” Expand questions for higher level such as: “Do you think the cow is always in the barn?” “Where else do you think the cow might be on the farm?” 
  • Action Words 
    • Have animals do a variety of actions: walk, hop, fly, swim, run, etc. With older children you can incorporate directional concepts: walk forward/backwards, toward/away from, to the right/left, etc. 

Language Targets

  • 1-2 word targets
    • Big dog
    • Little cat
    • Green frog
    • Hop! Hop!
  • 3-5 word targets
    • I see a red bird.
    • The horse is brown.
    • The frog can hop.
    • I like the little cat.  
  • For children with more advanced language:
    • Encourage higher level thinking by asking questions such as “Why do you think…. ?” , “What would happen if…?”, “What would you do if..”.etc. Take what your child says to model correct language structures and to add higher level vocabulary.  

Book: Pete the Cat I Love my White Shoes by Eric Litwin

Read Along HERE


Friday, April 3

Outdoor Color Hunt 

Materials  

  • None 

Steps  

  • Introduce the activity by talking about colors
    • You might use a pack of crayons to reinforce color names, or a picture of something colorful so the colors can be named. Ask if your child can think of something that has all those colors in it (hopefully they’ll come up with “rainbow”).  Ask if they’d like to go on a Rainbow Color Hunt to find all the colors of the rainbow. 
  • Go for a walk.  
    • Ask your child questions while you walk to get him/her to find a variety of colors. Questions might include: 
      • Do you see something red (yellow/blue, etc.)?
      • Tell me something that is the same color
      • What is your favorite color?
      • Can you find something that is your favorite color?  
  • Talk about shades of colors (light blue, medium blue, dark blue) and colors different from the basic 8 (like lime green or rust or hot pink). 
  • If possible, collect items that are different colors to take home. Assist your child in gluing the items to a sheet of paper to make a Rainbow Color Hunt collage. (It’ll be a reminder of the fun you had while on your walk!) 

Language Targets  

  • 1-2 word targets  
    • Color names: red, yellow, blue, green, orange, purple, etc.  
    • Color name + object: red flower, blue sky, green grass, etc.  
    • Walk  
    • Run 
  • 3-5 word targets  
    • I see a blue house.  
    • Oh no! There’s mud!  
    • I can walk fast!
  • 6+ word targets  
    • I’m looking for something big and red.  
    • Do you see that blue bird?  
    • I want to find a tiny purple flower.  
    • Dogs are usually black, brown, or white.  
    • May I pick that yellow flower? 

Book: When Spring Comes by Keven Henkes 

Read Along HERE 

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